Featured Articles:
Vol. 2, Issue 2

Severe mental illness and certain chronic bloodborne infections are often linked, creating unique considerations for patient care. Unfortunately, the oft fragmented delivery of health care leads to subpar management of these conditions.

Vol. 2, Issue 2

Treatment adherence is a cornerstone of the successful management of patients with chronic hepatitis B, yet it proves challenging for patients and providers alike.

Vol. 2, Issue 1

The United States has historically been called the land of opportunity, a place where people of any faith, ethnicity, or lifestyle can live without fear of persecution while pursuing economic prosperity. Enticed by these personal and financial freedoms, more than 35 million immigrants currently reside in America. However, with about 45% of the global population living in areas with a high prevalence of chronic hepatitis B (CHB), vaccination, screening, and awareness efforts for immigrants are vital to public health.

Vol. 2, Issue 1

On the southeast coast of China’s mainland lies the mountainous Fujian Province. Although it is one of China’s smaller provinces, Fujian is one of the largest sources of immigration from China into the United States.

Vol. 1, Issue 2

Despite comprising only 4.8% of the total US population, Asian Americans account for more than half of the 1.4 to 2 million CHB infections. The disproportionate rate of infections among this demographic is attributed to a variety of factors but, collectively, they represent a pressing public health concern within this population.

Vol. 1, Issue 2

Hepatitis B virus is often referred to as a silent killer—an apt moniker because chronically infected patients may be asymptomatic for years despite ongoing liver damage. Recent data suggest that up to 1.4 million individuals in the United States may be unaware of their CHB serostatus.

Vol. 1, Issue 1

In the tropical state of Hawaii, the sunlight is shining on a potentially deadly virus living quietly within many of its inhabitants. Hawaii’s diverse population1makes chronic hepatitis B, a largely asymptomatic condition and leading cause of liver cancer, a common, albeit unknown, burden.2 But primary care physicians (PCPs) in the “Aloha State” are taking the lead in bringing the disease into the open with preventative screening measures and slowing its progression with appropriate patient care.

Vol. 1, Issue 1

There is a substantial opportunity to reduce the prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the United States by more rigorous screening and vaccination.1 The list of groups that should be screened, according to guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, includes individuals born outside the United States in Asia, the Pacific Islands, Africa, and other regions with intermediate to high chronic hepatitis B endemicity (>2%); pregnant women; and nonvaccinated adults with risk factors including exposure (occupational, travel, or health care–related), high-risk sexual activity, and ...

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